The Econocracy: Manchester Book Launch

Recently, Joe Earle, Cahal Moran and Zach Ward-Perkins presented the central arguments of their book, The Econocracy, to a packed room in Uni Place. Noone could debate that these three had really thought this all out. Challenges were met always with referral back to the core message of the student movement, one which appeared more than ever to be uncontroversial. The room seemed engaged and respectful of the message. Present were all kinds of people of different ages and voices, ranging from one man who semi-jokingly suggested that economics as an entity might reasonably be discarded of, given it’s apparent uselessness in understanding the world. We had an engineering professor who proposed most enthusiastically that there should be a charter, similar to most professions. Such a charter would likely see countless economists struck off following 2008 of course, the thought of which elicited a chuckle from the audience. This proposition did seem to have a certain strength to it somehow. It stood out when Francesca in the work of PCES, rather than satisfying our youthful urge to ‘smash things up’, we instead reason and establish a dialogue with, the economics department and university at large. Rather than just expressing our frustrations to the good pedestrians of Oxford Road. This observation seemed particularly meaningful given the composition of the room where we had economics professors, administrators and general serious-looking adults. I was talking to a social anthropology professor in front of me who was most vociferous about how he thinks that social anthropology is in a similar state to economics. He talked of there being very specific case studies with...

Brussels on Post-Crash

One of the key motivations for PCES has been a forward-looking desire for us, as graduates of Economics, to understand our social environment and, beyond this, to change  it. Following the economic crisis of 2008 enigmas such as unemployment, debt crises and threats of inter-generational inequality persist. Often as students we are left to accept these aspects of our economy without much thought or resolution, and so it was a privilege for PCES to be invited to attend the “Labour Economics after the Crisis” conference by László Andor, Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion at the European Commission in Brussels last month. As the hub for EU policy-makers, the discussion over two days was enlightening on the matter of how economic theory influences the design and implementation of socio-economic policy. It was also an exposure to the power of institutions such as the EC, and their impact on the lives of people in the EU. The conference addressed key targets set for growth, youth unemployment, female participation in the labour market and job creation, and how these would be met through macroeconomic policy. The high calibre of speakers included Etsuro Honda, Special Adviser to the Prime Minister of Japan. Etsuro provided us with an analysis of Japan’s experience of reducing structural employment following the burst of an asset price bubble, and the movement to refocusing on “moral persuasion” to restore confidence in the Japanese economy. Japan’s experience was an intriguing start to the conference as a source of comparison for the EU. It highlighted the central issues an economy must focus on during recovery: the timing of policy,...